What customers don’t want to hear!

I personally feel that there is some sort of mediocrity that has infiltrated most businesses.  Needless to say, I hate shopping and only do it with my wife Barbara.  Over the last 6 months, I’ve created a list of some of the things I heard when shopping and that turned me completely off.  Here they are:

  1. “If you purchase this item now, you will help me meet my quota for the month. “ It meant to me that this individual was not really successful and was using me instead of helping me with why I should purchase that item.  What he should have said was something like:  “This (whatever) has been very popular and our customers are excited about the results they are getting.”

  2. “We can deliver your item sometime next week and will call you when we are in your neighborhood.”   This clearly showed that they were making it convenient for them rather than convenient for me.  Very selfish.  They should have said. “We can deliver this to you next week.  What day and time is convenient for you?”

  3. “That’s not my department.”  They didn’t even tell me who or where to go to find my item.  They should have said: “I know the right person who can help you with that item.  Please come with me.”

  4. “Oh my God.  It’s been so hectic for me this morning.  I barely made it to work, traffic was terrible, my Mom is sick and I had to take my dog to the vet, and my leg hurts.”  I didn’t want to hear about her problems.  I wanted to purchase what I was there for and get out.  All she had to say with a smile was, “Good morning, I’m glad to meet you.”

  5. “You’re the first person who has complained about our service.”  This statement was made to make me feel inferior and to imply that I was a troublemaker and that the company could do no wrong.  He should have said,   “Even though we receive many compliments about our product, we know there is room for improvement, so I’m beholding to you for making me aware of the problem.”

  6. Here’s another problem, one I encountered just this week while I was talking to a sales rep.  She said, “Tell me your name again and why you are here.”  It made me feel as if she didn’t listen to me in the first place.  We walked out and will never shop there again.  She should have said, “Mr. Varga, as I understand you, when you wife got home, she noticed a rip in the blouse where the security sensor was taken off. Right?   Then let me help you with that.”

  7. When my wife wanted to exchange an outfit she bought for another one, she was told: “That’s against our policy.” Wow! Turned my wife completely off. She wasn’t asking for her money back, just to exchange to a different size.   The sales rep should have said: “Mrs. Varga, while that is against our policy, I believe we can find a way to accommodate your request.” Doesn’t that sound better?

  8. Last but not least.  When we walked into a store we heard, “Sorry, it’s closing time; you can’t come in.”  This told me that this person wasn’t trained properly, as all of the above weren’t trained properly, and should have said, “As you can see, the store is closing now, but I will be happy to stay and help you.”

Could any of your reps be unknowingly telling your customers what they don’t want to hear?  Might you also say the wrong thing when you are having a “bad day”?  Or when you are rushed?  

How can you make sure this doesn’t happen in your business?  Let me know.


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59 Responses to “What customers don’t want to hear!”

  1. Isabella says:

    Wow, you have high expectations for retail clerks, the majority of whom are underpaid and work in less than great conditions. Instead of putting the burden on them, focus on the leadership that supervises them. A happy, well-paid, empowered employee is not going to tell a customer that it’s “not their department”.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Hi Isabella,

    Thanks for the comment. I agree that a happy, well-paid, and empowered employee will do better that the opposite, but it all boils down to training. When you train in the way you want a person to address your customer, in the way that is appropriate, and not except anything less, then you will overcome this problem. Do you agree?

    [Reply]

  2. Marie E. LeBlanc says:

    I very much agree with everything you stated ! I moved to the West coast of Canada 30 years ago and was appalled with the extremely poor customer service here ! Three decades later, it isn’t any better. Companies hire young people, give them absolutely no training, pay them minimum wage and wonder why they continually lose market share?! “It’s not my job” and “It’s over there” are the two most common refrains from these poorly educated, poorly paid “children”. Why should they care about offering a high quality of service, when no matter how poor their sales skills or, their attitudes, they still get paid – anyway ? I often thought that if I owned my own business out here, I could do very well for myself and now – I am doing just exactly that !

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Hi Marie,
    Congratulations on starting your own business. From your tone, it sounds like you are happy that your did. Good for you! And I bet your customers are happy that you did.

    [Reply]

  3. Russell says:

    Supplemental to your exchange example, when returning an item for whatever reason the customer does not want to hear “What’s the problem?. We’ve all heard it and we know how we feel. What we really needed to hear was “hi, how can I help you?”. Maybe that page was omitted from the customer service manual.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Hi Russell,
    I agree. “Hi, how can I help you?” is much more effective than: “What’s the problem?”

    [Reply]

  4. Lynda White says:

    Oh, Ken. I had that exact same thing happen with my husband when we first married.

    A Kirby rep came to our house and talked my husband into buying this vacuum for $1,000. He claimed he only needed one more sale to win a vacation to Hawaii. My husband almost fell for it.

    The vacuum worked really well, but was heavy and bulky, and I’m like, *I’m* the one that’s going to be using this – do you really expect me to lug this thing around and pay a month’s mortgatge so that a total stranger can have his vacation?

    Needless to say, my husband came to his senses, but that’s how powerful high pressure sales persons can be. He only took the vacuum back because we threatened him with court..I think there was a 3 day return clause in the papers he signed.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Good for you standing your ground Lynda!

    [Reply]

  5. Hi there,
    Thanks for the interesting article.
    I feel negitive messages around me all the time. It’s not only the verbal messages,like the examples you gave, but also the non-verbal ones. I’m refering to things like:
    The assistant approaches you smirking/aggitated about something else that’s going on in the store.
    or she/he approaches you but would clearly prefer to be chatting with her friend/ another assistant in the store.
    Looking sloppy and not put together is a major turn-off. Even at an event I feel that it’s essential to take a private moment to regroup, fix make-up/ freshen up etc… Not to give that “I’m exhausted and wish I was at home” look.
    Looking forwards to your thoughts.
    Amanda

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    You are right Amanda. You have the right approach…regroup, freshen up and project energy. That is attractive energy. That pulls sales. The other repels customers.

    [Reply]

    Cheryl Willison Reply:

    @Ken Varga,
    i absolutely agree with your comments Ken ,when i started out on facebook everyone who invited me to add them as a friend absolutely inundated me with trying to sell me their products .. maybe they thought i was a robot because they certainly didn’t treat me as a friend or even as a human being
    There was no conversation as such i only remember one person ever mentioning my name in fact how sad really?
    well done Ken excellent blog

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @Cheryl Willison,
    Cheryl, thanks for the compliment.

  6. Martin says:

    Dear Ken,
    It all has to do with compagny policy, very much as Isabella said. Most (chain) stores are not intrested in customer satisfaction but KPI on wages. This automatic leads to poor performance to the end-user. Your examples are clear enough. My worse experience sofar: “If you can’t find it, we don’t have it”
    I have experienced the same downfall in the last 10-15 years (I started my career as a jewelery shop sales rep but after 4 years of specialist training)and stopped getting annoid by poor sales people.
    I only shop at family runned businesses, better service, slightly higher costs but better service.
    I buy on-line after doing research upfront
    Find he correct chain stores, in Europe there is a DIY chain (similar like HomeDepot) who hires older plummers / carpeters etc. in the various departments or experienced DIY people. They know how to help you further.
    The best advise I can give to storemanagers is to thread your customers in the same way you want to be treated. Also remember that “selling is helping people buying”

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Yes Martin…always good to treat others the way you want to be treated. Even better is the platinum rule: treat others like THEY want to be treated.

    [Reply]

  7. Kevin Dean says:

    The comments from Mr. Varga are all excellent examples of how retail clerks can turn off customers and destroy any possibility of personal referrals to the business. I have worked retail in a small cell phone store where the supervisor could hear nearly everything I said to the customer and any one of those comments alone would’ve earned a strong warning. Two or three in a short time-span would’ve gotten me fired.

    But I’m inclined to agree with Marie’s statement about the burden of responsibility. She argues it the burden lies with management, not the clerks themselves, and I agree wholeheartedly with that. Other jobs where I was thrown into duties without forewarning or training resulted in poor performance on my part, as well as callous indifference. A hospitality job at the front desk of a poorly managed hotel had me apologizing left and right due to poor training and unreasonably high expectations.

    Mr. Varga, while I agree that the statements are offensive to the customer, the implicit argument that responsibility for good service lies with underpaid and exploited staff is not logical. Management, while not omniscient, is ultimately responsible because it is their task to monitor, encourage, train and when appropriate admonish the clerks to the fullest extent possible.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Kevin, absolutely right! If you look back at what I said in the 3rd sentence in # 8 on the list, you’ll notice I said: “This told me that this person wasn’t trained properly, as all of the above weren’t trained properly…” Ultimately, management is responsible.

    [Reply]

  8. KarenJ says:

    What I hate to hear is an excuse for poor service. When I called my dentist and complained because they couldn’t get me in for a month, what I wanted to hear was “I know it must be frustrating to have to wait so long for an appointment. Let me see what I can do,” instead of “Well, the doctors are really busy!” Yeah, so am I!

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    I understand your sentiment completely Karen. One of the shortcomings in most businesses is that management doesn’t teach all its staff members that they are part of marketing. Everyone in a company is part of marketing. Some of the staff may not carry out marketing functions, but they are influencing whether a prospect becomes a customer and whether a customer remains a customer. All staff members need to understand this.

    [Reply]

    Joe W. Smith Reply:

    @Ken Varga, I agree that all staff should be trained and reminded to smile and be polite to everyone. I worked several years in retail sales and my personal motto was; I will treat everyone the way I want to be treated at all time. When I was on commission I was always top sales person and most of my customers had been recomended by some one I had helped. Today I have my own business and I am building it based on “Excellence in Service”. Training is very important today, because lot of young people have not been taught to have good work ethics and how to be responsible.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @Joe W. Smith,
    Yes, Joe. Training is the key. And excellence is service will keep customers coming back. Great!

  9. Jacqueline Sharp says:

    I totally agree with you. All staff should be trained to smile, be polite and listen to questions, and if he or she cannot answer to say he will get back with an answer in a given time. Also, nothing is impossible in the realm of customer service. I do have a policy: I report all really bad customer service people by name; similarly I report all report all excellent representatives in the same manner.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Jacqueline, I agree that all staff should be trained to smile, be polite, etc. And I think the training should go beyond teaching the staff to go through the motions. It should go to the level of teaching them to appreciate the customer and understanding that it’s the customer that pays the staff’s salary. Without the customer, everyone working at the place of business will be out of work. The smiling and politeness should come from a place of deep appreciation.

    [Reply]

  10. Mark Barton says:

    AS a customer we now have the power to tell not just the few people you meet for a cup of coffee but a whole raft of people. How many of us have seen #fail on Facebook Twitter or elsewhere? More people have seen my comments on some recent poor customer service on http://bit.ly/djBxoa than I could hvae spoken to.

    Week begining October 4th is Customer Service Week. For some businesses it is not a problem, they get it. Lets hope that we can make customer service a higher prioroity in the businesses that at present attract the #fail all too regularly.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Yes, Mark. Review sites and social media will help push businesses toward better customer service.

    [Reply]

  11. Cristine Kinross says:

    May I add another item to your list? Each salesperson who has ever told me that “this price is only good for today” in an attempt to persuade me to make a fast decision has regretted it immediately. As someone with over a decade of experience in sales and marketing, I know that prices are never good for one day only. I don’t go to test drive a car, for example, unless I wish to make an immediate purchase. It is rude to rush a customer into a significant buying decision.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Good point Christine. You are right that most of the time businesses do this to force a fast decision. When done this way, it is manipulative and not in the best interest of the customer. On rare occasions, the business may be doing a price test.

    [Reply]

  12. Ryan McCann says:

    To play Devils Advocate – from working in retail for years the number ONE barrier to customer services has always been the customer. Customer-service gets so often abused by customer-entitlement, customer-lies, customer-abuse, and customer-fraud.

    Perhaps the modern paradigm is one of Customer-entitlement where the customer is king and all others are there to serve him. But do remember that there are thousands of other customers ALL WITH THE SAME IDEA, all making unreasonable demands, expecting the moon, and paying pennies.
    By the time the poor clerk gets to you all his Saintly patience, time, energy and motivation has been sucked out of him like a vampire.

    The key to getting good service is to remember Business relationships are just that – RELATIONSHIPS. Relationships are a two-way win-win situation. Learn what the clerks job duties are, what rules he has to follow and where he is able to bend them. Learn his NAME (its right there on that tag) Treat him like a slave he’ll treat you like a number, treat him like a person and he’ll treat you like a friend.

    Remember there is world of different between good customer service and “GOOD CUSTOMER” service

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Ryan, your point is well taken. As the saying goes: “It takes two to tango”. However, a business owner’s sphere of control is his employees. S/he has limited control over which customers are “GOOD” customers. So staff has to be trained and be ready for the “BAD” customers; there should be processes in place as to how to deal with those customers that feel “entitled”. “BAD” customers are part of the cost of doing business and staff should be trained to be prepared for them.

    [Reply]

  13. Jay Freed says:

    Ultimately, the responsibility of good customer service begins with management. Management is responsible in training their employees, setting standaards of conduct, and making sure all employees abide and respresent the company’s values in all their interactions. As a previous owner of a large retail operation, I always appreciated customer feedback that I got from customers. The feedback was used in ongoing training – (without naming names) — how should you handle this situation. Training is good, ongoing training with reinforecement is better. While some “clerks” may be young and at the low end of the pay scale — the good ones should relish the opportunity to develop customer service skills because these skills are the foundation for building a successful career later in life.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Agreed Jay. And I think that even the young clerks could come to appreciate the value of good customer service when they are given the proper perspective.

    [Reply]

  14. Paul says:

    In a recent job interview I was asked to define “hospitality”. I said “Make the customer comfortable, whatever that means to them.” Unfortunately, most retail firms, including the ones I’ve worked in, have lost their customer focus. Before long, they will lose their profit center. I am sorry for your unpleasant experiences, it makes us all look bad.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Paul, being hospitable is one good way to look at the customer service issue.

    [Reply]

  15. Jo Ann Kirby says:

    There are many causes of poor service. Certainly poor management is one. As a training consultant I’ll often find myself speaking with companies that want to improve their workers skills. Digging deep however, I’ll find processes and policies that actually stifle good customer service. However, I’ll not agree with the justification of poor service because the workers are poorly paid. Whatever happened to the idea that we do our best jobs regardless, simply because it’s a matter of pride in ourselves to do a job well done? Perhaps it’s an old fashioned concept but you know the pay when you take the job, you probably have an inkling of the conditions- if you take the job you should do it properly.

    I’ll also not agree with the comment that poor service is brought on by entitled customers. It’s harder to give good service to them but it should’t be used as justification for poor behaviors on the part of service workers. If you want your business to be successful you must give good service or face the potential consequences of loss of revenues. Obviously you can choose not to do business with someone but it should be done in a way that leaves a good impression.

    However, I would like to bring up a thought process I had recently. Just think about this. Many times, poor service is really just a manifestation of bad manners and etiquette. Often you may find these weren’t taught properly to begin with. Where do we learn good manners – in our homes, of course. Children need to learn how to behave properly with respect for others. Instill in them empathy, values and a good work ethic. Yes, managers need to show workers how to use their manners for best results on the job but it is easier to do when people grow up being expected to behave properly in the first place.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @Jo Ann Kirby,
    Hi Jo Ann,
    All your points are well taken. And since a manager doesn’t have influence on the employees’ upbringing, what it comes down to is the hiring process. The manager or HR Department has to make sure that they are hiring staff who can deliver the kind of service that the company wants delivered to the customers, and then they have to train the staff in how to deliver that service.

    [Reply]

  16. Greg Kulig says:

    Over the years business has been changing. We all want good customer service but slowly we settle for the best price. As a small business we offer great service, but you still hear people saying; It’s $2 cheaper at Wallmart.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    Yes Greg. Because of the plethora of products and services available, customers/prospects are beginning to see most products/services as commodities. When they consider a product/service to be a commodity, they then make their decisions based on price.

    [Reply]

  17. The experience that bothers me is the sales rep who acts like they want to get to know you but lets it all go as soon as you decide not to buy what they have. Building a relationship with the potential client/customer is what is important in the long run. People like to buy; they do not like to be sold.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @Gerald Bricker,
    Yes Gerald, so true. People like to buy (some love it), but almost nobody likes to be sold. When a salesperson helps a customer buy, it’s generally a much better experience for the salesperson and the customer.

    [Reply]

  18. James Hoag says:

    On of my favorite stories happened to me in New Jersey. The people there are known for their rudeness and customer service is almost unknown. I entered a small shop to buy something. The clerk had her back to me when I entered and as I approached, she turned and in an angry voice said “What do you want?” Normally I might have just snapped back, but I said “It sounds like you’ve had a really bad day.” It was like air being let out of a balloon. She just sagged against the counter and said “You have no idea, how can I help you.”
    I think I turned what could have been a bad situation into a good one. So, like Ryan, I feel the responsibility for good customer service lies with the customer as well as the merchant.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @James Hoag,
    Congratulations James. You turned a potentially bad situation into a good one. Excellent!

    [Reply]

  19. I’ve got one for you! I wasn’t planning on shopping, but last minute went into a store to check out the prices on a new TV. I was dressed extremely casual, no makeup, not looking my best. Probably looked like I didn’t have money or credit. The sales person, didn’t give me his full attention, and actually walked away to help a dapper looking couple that walked into the area. Another sales person approached me, was WONDERFUL! He knew what each TV had to offer. He asked me the right questions to know which TV would best meet my needs and desires, and didn’t oversell me. I ended up buying not only a new TV, but also a complete theater system. I spent loads of money! I told my sales guy that he needed to brag about this sale to the other guy who walked away from me. I didn’t look like I had money to spend that day, but looks can be deceiving!!

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @Tina Gosnold, CB,
    Well Tina, you may have taught the salesman who walked away two things: don’t be hasty to judge; and, turn attention from himself to the potential customer. If his attention was on you rather than on himself or on the sale, he would have gotten the sale.

    [Reply]

  20. A reader says:

    Actually, I worked retail in high school, and currently, I’m an accountant. In several discussions lately, I believe the cause of the entitlement by so many across the country is the idea that “the customer is always right”. The customer isn’t always right, and the people serving them aren’t robots.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @A reader,
    Customers aren’t always right. But it’s better for us to approach the situation as though they are. That allows us to hear their point of view instead of trying to defend ours. When we can hear them, we can empathize and that usually leads to solutions that work for both them and us. If we approach the situation from the point of view that they are wrong, nobody wins. In the situations where you can’t satisfy a customer, try to end the relationship gracefully.

    [Reply]

  21. Joel Mosier says:

    I agree with your assessment completely, Ken. Although I would say that it isn’t only about training but it is also about hiring the right people. Companies need to hire people that genuinely care about other people. Ultimately, the end of a sale should not be the sale, the commission, the gross margin, or anything like that, the end of a sale should be a satified customer. If that is your goal, you will never lack for sales, commissions, or any thing else. by genuinely caring about the customer, the list above doesn’t happen. Manager’s role needs to be to encourage that and reward that mindset.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @Joel Mosier,
    Joel, you are right! It isn’t just about training. It starts with hiring. There must be a hiring process in place to identify and hire the candidates that fit the type of employees needed for the job. And part of the screening process should be to identify those candidates that care for others. Then the training tops of the process.

    [Reply]

  22. Sometimes it is the company that is at fault. I received a Christmas present from my daughter that did not fit me so I went to the store to try to exchange it for one like it at my size and while at the store I was planning on making a few more purchases. I did not realize that their 60 day return policy was from the date the purchase was made not from the time that I received the gift. I was a week off. I was told that the item was no longer available but I was welcome to find something else that cost the same as the item but the item has undergone several price reductions since my daughter purchased it that now it was worth only $3.60. I wrote the company about the experience and all I received was a form letter that said someone will respond within 5 days. I followed up after 5 days when I did not hear from them but all I received was the same form letter. It has been 2 years now and I have not received a letter from the company. I normally spend at least $2,000 per year with this company and since then have not stepped foot inside any of their stores. The company was willing to sacrifice $2,000 per year for a $50 issue.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @Vivian Valenty,
    Vivian, this company, was short-sighted, like many others. This is what I was describing in my article. Customers come to a business for help; not for excuses. This company was focused on the one transaction and not on keeping you as a customer for life. How sad, for both you and the company!

    [Reply]

  23. Greg Schmalz says:

    Ken,

    While I didn’t read the entire trail, I get th gist of what you are saying. People (and companies) fail to recognize the importance — and value — of customer service. If a customer has a bad experience, they are likely to go elsewhere. The company then loses its brand loyalty.

    Let me share this example last week as I dined alone in a restaurant. I assume the young fellow who waited on me was either new or rather inexperienced. He came over to my table and was polite but he never asked if this was my first time dining at this establishment and never introduced himself. He was polite and service was good.

    However, when I paid my bill, I offered some suggestions that could help him have better customer dialogue, such as “Good evening, my name is Bill and I will be your server tonight. Welcome to (name of restaurant). Is this your first time here or have you dined with us before?”

    This sets the proverbial table on how he can assist his customer. Yet, it was obvious that he was not properly trained.

    And I think we find that all too often that sales staff or anyone who interacts with customers are not properly trained and don’t want to take responsibility. That’s fine, but at least try to help get some answers to help point the customer in the right direction. In this economy, no one can afford to lose a customer.

    [Reply]

    Ken Varga Reply:

    @Greg Schmalz,
    Greg, well-said! It’s a matter of mindset, both with the management and the staff. If they see the customer as just “a mouth to feed” (in this restaurant case), then their focus is just on providing food. If they see you as a customer that’s there for more than just the food, they will introduce themselves and ask if “it’s your first time”, etc. Another way to say it is it’s a matter of short-term vision versus long-term vision. The short-term vision is: “I’ll feed him”. The long-term vision is: “How can I serve this customer best?” The long-term vision leads to greater possibilities of service.

    [Reply]

  24. Thanks for the marvelous posting! I genuinely enjoyed reading it, you may be a great author.

    [Reply]

  25. Chandrasekar says:

    Hi Mr. Varga,

    It’s good compilation of customer handling, most often handled the other way.
    Reasons are plenty from underpaid salaries to undeserved candidates on counters and most often however highly paid, the attitude is always an “employee” attitude which breaks the line.
    The leadership at the top should have vision for the organization and also to create Leadership at all levels in respective roles.
    Leaders leading by example…comes with it ownership and accountability.

    [Reply]

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